4/20/2022

No Food No Medicine: Sri Lanka's Crushing Debt Problem

Sri Lanka is in its worst economic crisis and the country is facing a steep challenge to pay back its crushing 4.5B debt problem. These are debts accumulated through borrowing from foreign countries to build large scale projects to revive the economy after a natural disaster in 2004. Unable to pay off these debts, equity of these large scale projects now belong to countries like China. The country’s 22M people are facing the most painful economic downturn since the country’s independence in 1948. With no food, no fuel, or no medicine available to Sri Lankans, the people are losing confidence in their President Gotabaya Rajapaksa. Protests swelled demanding the president to resign and crowds have attempted to storm the homes of government leaders. On April 19th, Police in Sri Lanka opened fire on crowds protesting at fuel shortages during the economic crisis, leaving one man dead and 11 others wounded.

4/20/2022

No Food No Medicine: Sri Lanka's Crushing Debt Problem

Sri Lanka is in its worst economic crisis and the country is facing a steep challenge to pay back its crushing 4.5B debt problem. These are debts accumulated through borrowing from foreign countries to build large scale projects to revive the economy after a natural disaster in 2004. Unable to pay off these debts, equity of these large scale projects now belong to countries like China. The country’s 22M people are facing the most painful economic downturn since the country’s independence in 1948. With no food, no fuel, or no medicine available to Sri Lankans, the people are losing confidence in their President Gotabaya Rajapaksa. Protests swelled demanding the president to resign and crowds have attempted to storm the homes of government leaders. On April 19th, Police in Sri Lanka opened fire on crowds protesting at fuel shortages during the economic crisis, leaving one man dead and 11 others wounded.

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Asian Horror Implies Misogyny Is Thriving

What Asian horror movies have proven is that there is nothing scarier than a woman, free from her shackles, wreaking havoc on society to get justice. Why is the ghostly, vengeful woman such a prevalent trope, and how does it represent misogyny across Asian cultures? From the infamous virgin ghost, to the seductive “femme fatale” archetypes, there are consistent depictions of the vengeful female spirit throughout Asian stories. The pale, long black-haired woman in a white dress is the scariest ghost of all. While these characters might begin as victims, they become terrifying villains, making it difficult to sympathize with their pain. It’s the unfair deaths these female characters experience that turn their spirits into monsters that are feared and not souls free to rest. There is little understanding of their suffering, or even their existence, mirroring the reality of many. It’s possible this trope persists because scary stories have often been the only outlet to name the violence women face. In patriarchal societies that view women as subservient, many women die in unfair suffering: murder, death connected to sexual assault, and forced suicide. Asian horror has evolved to incorporate deeper commentaries about women’s issues over time like marital anxiety, dissociative identity disorders, and becoming a widow. But irrespective of final outcome,being abused and thus vengeful continues to be the most natural character foundation of Asian women in horror stories and films.

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No Food No Medicine: Sri Lanka's Crushing Debt Problem