EPISODES

Mini docs

EST

Mini docs

Short docs about often-overlooked people & issues in Asia.

Mini docs

Kee Moo Members Speak On Queerness, Belonging, and Freedom

Here’s an insider’s look into Kee Moo, where queer performers found friendship, belonging, freedom, and safety. As a group of friends bonded by both sexuality and music, they share their journeys to self-discovery–and what their favorite pop stars like Whitney, Beyonce, and Britney taught them. In Thailand, “Katoey” was a word used to describe transgender people. Now it encompasses all queer people, ensuring greater inclusivity. Kee Moo is a powerful example of diversity within the Katoey community, consisting of performers who share how being confident and courageous can be perceived as attention seeking and abnormal in Thai culture. With the help of their favorite musical “divas”, these five stars create their own fulfilled, authentic, and proud lives. Whether it’s learning that people make mistakes from Lindsay Lohan’s tumultuous career, to “being different is better than being the same” from Lady Gaga, here’s an insider’s peek into how pop culture helped these queer Thai artists persevere and step into their own light.

Mini docs

Breaking Asian Stereotypes With A Gang Called Speed

Jem elbowed his way into the hardcore music scene with a face and attitude that Australia had never seen. He recruited Sydney’s hardest Asian men - his brother Aaron, Dennis on guitar, Kane on drums, and his best friend Josh - and formed SPEED. The band was struck by the love it received once the music video dropped. The Sydney Hardcore scene took notice, but more unexpectedly the Asian community resonated with their music. With the rise of Asian hate crimes around the globe, SPEED mirrored how Asians felt. Their music became a calling card forAsians to get involved in the Hardcore scene or even start their own band to relinquish their untapped energy. The outcome? Everything good from multicultural Sydney, including street culture, fashion, Hip Hip, tattoos, and hard Asian men.

Mini docs

The Young Women Building Kyrgyzstan's First Satellite

Kyzzhibek Batyrkanova leads a team of women who aim to launch Kyrgyzstan’s 1st ever satellite. As the program director at the Kyrgyz Satellite she built a team of unstoppable women who will make history. They learn the basics of engineering and apply those skills to build a nano-satellite that can collect and analyze data from outer space. Once they reach the final goal of securing a launch service provider, the satellite will be transported to the International Space Station and launched into orbit. In a country where young women face rigid gender stereotypes and even kidnapping that forces them to become wives, the women at Kyrgyz Satellite are pioneering a new space for girls in STEM. Do you want to support this program? Donate here: http://patreon.com/kyrgyzspaceprogram

Mini docs

Indonesian Shamans are Changing Their Rituals In Times of Covid

A Dukun is an Indonesian term for shaman. Today, Dukuns in Indonesia like Ki Sawaung Rahsa and Ki Cokro Santri, have started revamping their spiritual offerings across digital platforms. If spirituality is energy and energy moves according to the mind, why can’t spirituality travel through objects we interact with everyday? This mindset got Ki Sawung Rahsa and Ki Cocro to widen their services, from traditional offerings like implanting gold needles into bodies to harness spiritual powers to consulting spiritual seekers via video call.

Mini docs

Controlling the Weather with an Indonesian Rain Shaman

Pawang Hujans are rain shamans. In a country like Indonesia that experiences sudden monsoon downpours, Jendi Afriandi is hired to talk with spirits and keep outdoor events rain-free. Indonesians are deeply spiritual, and now that the country is easing COVID restrictions, this Rain Shaman is back at work. This is a day in his life. Would you hire a rain shaman for your outdoor event?

Mini docs

Inside the Pirated Kaset Tape Scene in Indonesia

Kaset tapes were an affordable opportunity for Indonesian listeners to access contemporary Western pop culture – this unique culture would influence young local musicians to play Rock-and-Roll, but make that sound their own. Bootleg Kasets became so wide spread due to price and ease that it sparked a global debate about copyright in the international music industry.