4/27/2021

Afghanistan is on the Verge of Death

The United States and Taliban authorities are contributing to the dire suffering of Afghanistan, disproportionately women and children. Bombings continue – particularly in places or worship, attacks on minority groups are on the rise, and 22M people are facing extreme hunger according to The World Food Program. It’s expected that a million children under the age of 5 will die within this year for hunger related reasons. President Biden’s executive order to divert half of Afghanistan’s ($7B) aid to 9/11 victim’s families has been met with criticism: a statement by 14 U.N. independent rights experts also blamed the U.S. government for making life worse for Afghan women through blocking billions of dollars that could be used to provide desperately-needed humanitarian relief to tens of millions in the country. Indian External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar reminded Europe on Tuesday: “You spoke about Ukraine, I remember what happened less than a year ago in Afghanistan where an entire civil society was thrown under the bus by the world,” he said in response to a question asked by Norway’s foreign minister, Anniken Huitfeldt. Here’s Keshia Hannam with what has been happening since the Taliban took over and how the US contributed to, and needs to be held accountable, for the crisis in Afghanistan. Link to support: https://linktr.ee/AFBT

4/27/2021

Afghanistan is on the Verge of Death

The United States and Taliban authorities are contributing to the dire suffering of Afghanistan, disproportionately women and children. Bombings continue – particularly in places or worship, attacks on minority groups are on the rise, and 22M people are facing extreme hunger according to The World Food Program. It’s expected that a million children under the age of 5 will die within this year for hunger related reasons. President Biden’s executive order to divert half of Afghanistan’s ($7B) aid to 9/11 victim’s families has been met with criticism: a statement by 14 U.N. independent rights experts also blamed the U.S. government for making life worse for Afghan women through blocking billions of dollars that could be used to provide desperately-needed humanitarian relief to tens of millions in the country. Indian External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar reminded Europe on Tuesday: “You spoke about Ukraine, I remember what happened less than a year ago in Afghanistan where an entire civil society was thrown under the bus by the world,” he said in response to a question asked by Norway’s foreign minister, Anniken Huitfeldt. Here’s Keshia Hannam with what has been happening since the Taliban took over and how the US contributed to, and needs to be held accountable, for the crisis in Afghanistan. Link to support: https://linktr.ee/AFBT

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Asian Horror Implies Misogyny Is Thriving

What Asian horror movies have proven is that there is nothing scarier than a woman, free from her shackles, wreaking havoc on society to get justice. Why is the ghostly, vengeful woman such a prevalent trope, and how does it represent misogyny across Asian cultures? From the infamous virgin ghost, to the seductive “femme fatale” archetypes, there are consistent depictions of the vengeful female spirit throughout Asian stories. The pale, long black-haired woman in a white dress is the scariest ghost of all. While these characters might begin as victims, they become terrifying villains, making it difficult to sympathize with their pain. It’s the unfair deaths these female characters experience that turn their spirits into monsters that are feared and not souls free to rest. There is little understanding of their suffering, or even their existence, mirroring the reality of many. It’s possible this trope persists because scary stories have often been the only outlet to name the violence women face. In patriarchal societies that view women as subservient, many women die in unfair suffering: murder, death connected to sexual assault, and forced suicide. Asian horror has evolved to incorporate deeper commentaries about women’s issues over time like marital anxiety, dissociative identity disorders, and becoming a widow. But irrespective of final outcome,being abused and thus vengeful continues to be the most natural character foundation of Asian women in horror stories and films.

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Afghanistan is on the Verge of Death